hanging

Tinkles just hanging around…

Tinkles was hanging in a ceiling air vent this morning!

Tinkles the Christmas elf hanging in a ceiling vent

Tinkles the Christmas elf hanging in a ceiling vent

Is Tinkles flying or swimming?

This morning we woke to find Tinkles hanging from the Octopod!

So a few years ago, when my younger kids were in love with The Octonauts, I made them a light fitting in the form of the Octopod (the main base submarine that the Octonauts live and travel in). Tinkles apparently thinks hanging from the Octopod is a good vantage spot (she can certainly see everything in my son’s room and the front door from there!)

From Lego dragon yesterday to Octopod today – maybe Tinkles likes high places, or maybe she is just getting an overview to start things off…

Tinkles the elf hanging from an orange ocotpod light fitting

And here is a clearer view of the Octopod  – essentially  a large orange ball with a window at the top and four balls connected to the sides as living quarters – although it doesn’t show the maze of tinsel underneath her (my son’s idea of decorating his room!).

Tinkles the elf and the Octopod

Make paper decorations

The year 3 students at our school recently made some Christmas decorations – and I think they are lovely!

paper Christmas decorations hanging in a window overlooking greenery

I spotted them on a bench outside the classroom and couldn’t resist grabbing some photos before ours arrived home a few days later.

collection of children's hanging Christmas decorations

How to make hanging Christmas decorations

You will need:

  • one A4 sheet of thin cardboard per decoration (obviously you can use a bigger sheet of cardboard to make lots of these!)
  • scissors
  • staples (and stapler!)
  • decorations – glitter glue, stickers, textas, glitter
  • shiny string (or plain string or thin ribbon) for hanging

cardboard, ruler, pencil, stapler and scissor to make a Christmas decoration

You then need to cut the cardboard into strips. For each hanging decoration, you will need to cut 7 strips about 5 cm wide based on:

  • 2 x full length
  • 2 x 2/3 length
  • 3 x 1/3 length

{This makes it a good maths activity, too, and will stretch the kids brains as well as building their fine motor skills while having fun and being creative!}

red and green cardboard strips

Strips cut for the alternative, wider decoration (see below)

Arrange the strips from biggest to smallest to biggest. That is, make a pile of

  • 1 full length
  • 1 2/3 length
  • 3 1/3 length
  • 1 2/3 length
  • 1 full length

Make the pile neat, with all strips meeting at one end of the pile. Staple the ends together.

stapled strips of reed and green cardboard

Bend the strips towards each other so all the loose ends line up together, and staple again.

Put a hole in one end and thread string/ribbon through (or just staple on the string or ribbon if you prefer) so the decoration can hang.

Now make it beautiful with textas, stickers and glitter glue.

Alternatively, staple a few decorations together to make a longer decoration, and just add string/ribbon at one end. Or attach some string to two decorations so there is a little room for them to sway independently. connected hanging decorations hanging in a window

They can hang on a tree, in a window or from a ceiling. Somewhere that catches an occasional breeze gives a pretty effect.

child-made hanging decorations hanging in a window

Many of the children at school chose to use black card so the glitter and stickers stood out more, but I also like the colourful cardboard ones. What will you make – colourful or black?

An alternative is to have 2 1/3 lengths and one 1/6 length to have a decoration that is much wider than it is tall – this is what happened when I followed my kids’ instructions initially!

red and green card decoration

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