Christmas Memories

Pin the carrot…

Tinkles had found a new friend and they like playing together!

This morning we found a chopping board leaning against the couch to enable Tinkles and her new friend, Tooth Elf (this elf lives with us all the time and holds onto any fallen out teeth until the tooth fairy collects them, usually leaving a financial token in the elf’s pouch in appreciation!) to play pin the carrot nose on the snowman!

Christmas elf and tooth elf playing pin the nose on the snowman

I am feeling a bit inspired to set up some sort of pin the … games for this afternoon. We have done many variants of this game to suit birthday party themes, etc, and we’ve even done a snowman before (it was Olaf for a Frozen party). I think I will need a slightly bigger blindfold for the kids though – the ribbon suits Tinkles but the kids’ heads a little bigger!

Christmas elf playing pin the nose on the snowman

What would you call Tinkles’ game though – pin the carrot on the snowman or pin the nose on the snowman?

Welcome back Tinkles!

Christmas must be coming as we woke this morning to find Tinkles the elf has returned to our home!

It was very exciting to find that Tinkles has her own little elf door… my nine year old was heard to say “If only Tinkles wasn’t leaning there, I’d have so opened that door by now!”

Tinkles the Christmas Elf sitting beside her door and Christmas tree!

It was very exciting to find Tinkles with her own door and Christmas tree – the kids loved the welcome mat, too! And they took turns reading the letter out loud to us all.

Tinkles sitting beside a doormat printed with 'Santa stop here!'

Close up to see the door mat in front of Tinkles’ Christmas door

We noted that the letterhead was a little different this year, and then spotted the PS from Santa “PS Tinkles was cheeky and added her photo above – did you notice?”

Letterhead of Snata and elves - with Tinkles face pasted on top!

 

Lego and Christmas

Last week I saw a 2018 Lego set of a winter village fire station at Christmas, and it got me thinking of how Lego is very much a part of many Christmases.

collage of images of Lego village fire station at Christmas

Not a key part of Brickman Cities, but a Christmas set couldn’t be missed!

Sometimes, it is used for major city displays, like the massive Christmas tree in Melbourne for Christmas 2015, Santa in his sleigh in Cardiff in 2018, the Christmas train in Cardiff this year, Brickman’s Christmas tree in Sydney in 2014 and the massive Santa in New York.

Lego Chirstmas display in Melbourne, 2015

The Lego tree in Fed Square 2015 was amazing – and very Australian!

And some people have giant Lego displays, themselves – like the 8 foot Lego advent calendar!

Lego itself produces Christmas themed Lego sets. I assume these are mostly for people keen on Christmas and Christmas displays, but lots of kids would also enjoy finding Christmas Lego under the tree on Christmas morning!

collage of Lego Christmas set images

From a Christmas village to Santa and trains, Lego has a range of Christmas kits…

Many Christmas trees around the world have Lego decorations on them, too. Whether made from generic bits of Lego, done through last year’s advent calendar or buy a specific Lego kit for an ornament.

And of course, there are the Lego advent calendars, for City, Friends, Star Wars and Harry Potter, which have given many kids pleasure and excitement throughout December.

So what’s the connection between Lego and Christmas?

We could be a little cynical and just say a corporation is commercially savvy and being part of a huge retail season, although city displays are not generally managed by Lego themselves. But maybe it’s developed over time from all those Lego boxes and sets being opened as Christmas gifts since Lego was started in 1932…

A little Christmas in space!

Have you been to a space museum or centre?

I’ve been to one near Canberra and it was interesting. As expected, there was information about space exploration and how planets, stars and galaxies work. There wasn’t much connection to Christmas though!

However, a good friend is currently in the USA and she visited the Kennedy Space Centre on Merritt Island in Florida. And she found the unexpected – Christmas display in a space centre! Ok, it was mostly Christmas ornaments (which make nice souvenirs!) in the gift shop, and being close to Disney World the Mickey Mouse theme makes sense, but here are the photos she shared with us.

Display of Christmas ornaments at Kennedy Space Centre

 

 

Even elves need to work out!

There was great amusement and happiness this morning when we discovered Tinkles sitting on the kitchen bench lifting weight!

Sure, the weights were marshmallows, but that is more significant when you are as small as Tinkles!

Christmas elf lifting marshmallows on a stick as weights

Whilst Tinkles may feel marshmallows are heavy enough to lift, my son thinks they are tasty enough to eat…

Boy trying ot eat elf's marshmallow weights

Tinkles got into the chocolates!

This morning Tinkles was found inside a box of Lindt chocolates, with wrappers on the floor around her… Ok, she has good taste, but we’re not happy at giving up our Lindt balls!

She did leave us a note, saying she tried to only have one ball…

"I really really tried to have just one" message from our Christmas elf

Day eight of Christmas countdowns…

Being Saturday, it has been harder for my kids to wait for evening to do their advent calendars! They’d love to open them each morning but I figure finding Tinkles is enough to fit in before school, so advent calendars are for counting the end of each day and see how many more days there are to go…

When do you open advent calendars in your house?

Ornament calendar

Our press out ornament calendar was themed on presents tonight – two gift boxes piled as an ornament, and a picture of two elves wrapping presents.

Present ornament from press out calendar

Lego City

A picture paints a thousand words they say – just as well I can add a picture of today’s Lego City advent item as I have no idea what to call it! It certainly isn’t a Christmas item – what do you think it is? I should add that my son believes it is a drone, and I can kind of see that…

Lego item from City advent calendar

Lego Friends

Our newest Lego ornament is a candy cane – bigger than a Lego character or the common candy canes, and harder to put together than you may think (three different types of connector meant you have to concentrate to get it working). There are little vents in the long straight pieces – I’m not sure what they are for…

large Lego candy cane

Christmas Book

Tonight we have a party to attend so we deliberately read a short Christmas book – Dear Santa. It is a lovely story, aimed more at babies than school aged kids but still a lovely book to look at together before we head out! Enjoy your Saturday night!

Christmas wreaths

Growing up, we didn’t have a wreath at home and I didn’t see many, except sometimes in repeated street decorations.

But I now have wreaths around my house, and like seeing them around – especially seeing the variety of wreaths around!

A variety of wreaths…

Here are just a few wreaths that I have seen and like… which is your favourite?

A poinsettia wreath

Felt poinsettia wreath handing on a blue wall

Bec’s gum leaf and stick wreath

I love the simplicity and natural Aussie look of this wreath that Bec made.

Christmas wreath made from gum leaves and sticks

Jen’s food themed wreath

Christmas wreath with food themed attachments

A cheese wreath

Baked cheese Christmas wreath on a wooden board

Some gum leaf wreaths

Some gumnut wreaths made by kinder children (Excuse the background as they dried on a cars mat!)

gumnut wreaths drying - kids Christmas craft

A golden bauble wreath from Erica

Erica made this beautiful wreath “$40 worth of baubles, $7 hot glue and a pool noodle, plus 15 hours and multiple hot glue burns – Bauble wreath is complete! ”

a wreath of golden baubles

Tracy’s natural wreath

Tracy Davison attended a workshop and made this gorgeous wreath (her first ever), saying ” I used about 8 or more different elements to it and I was thrilled with how it turned out. It is all natural, so has that lovely smell of evergreen, very Christmasy?”

natural wreath

Sophie’s floral wreath

Last year, interior designer Sophie Kost shared with us her tips for Christmas decorating and an image of her lovely floral wreath.

Red, orange and beige Christmas wreath on a door

Fir tree and lights wreath

green Christmas wreath with fairy lights

A gingerbread wreath

brown wreath with gingerbread man and stars

A red berry wreath

I spotted this pretty wreath Westminster Christmas shop when we visited last year.

red berry wreath

A large wreath

This wreath (and a few matching ones) was hanging on the Melbourne Town Hall in 2015 – it was larger than most Christmas wreaths!

large green wreath decorated with coloured baubles

So what wreaths do you have at home? Are there other wreaths you love? Either way, share your wreath photos in the comments so we can all enjoy them!

Is Tinkles flying or swimming?

This morning we woke to find Tinkles hanging from the Octopod!

So a few years ago, when my younger kids were in love with The Octonauts, I made them a light fitting in the form of the Octopod (the main base submarine that the Octonauts live and travel in). Tinkles apparently thinks hanging from the Octopod is a good vantage spot (she can certainly see everything in my son’s room and the front door from there!)

From Lego dragon yesterday to Octopod today – maybe Tinkles likes high places, or maybe she is just getting an overview to start things off…

Tinkles the elf hanging from an orange ocotpod light fitting

And here is a clearer view of the Octopod  – essentially  a large orange ball with a window at the top and four balls connected to the sides as living quarters – although it doesn’t show the maze of tinsel underneath her (my son’s idea of decorating his room!).

Tinkles the elf and the Octopod

Christmas in Norway

After reading about Doctor Proctor, Nilly, Lisa and Santa, I looked into some Norwegian Christmas traditions.

Christmas obviously has similarities and connections, but the celebrations in Australia and Norway are unsurprisingly different.

Two images - Norway covered in snow and a Christmas table in a sunny park

Christmas in Norway

Being in the northern hemisphere and so close to the North Pole, December in Norway is often snowy and Christmas is in the middle of darkness thus is celebrated with lights to welcome the coming of spring and summer. From pagan beginnings about seasons and harvests, Christmas was slowly Christianised in Norway and surrounding countries – it remained Jul but focused on the birth of Jesus.

In Norway, to say God Jul or Gledelig Jul is like us saying Merry Christmas. In parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia, they speak North-Sami and they say Buorit Juovllat.

But I have yet to find anything about children writing to Santa or receiving letters from Santa

Christmas dates  24 gifts in a grid, each numbered to form an advent calendar

  • celebrations and present sharing are held on Christmas Eve, leaving Christmas Day as a quiet day for brunch and to read books and enjoy gifts (and I’m guessing they recover from the food of the day before if they are like us!) This includes most families going to church – even if they are not Christian or church goers
  • the 23rd of December is called Little Christmas Eve (or lillejulaften)
  • Christmas starts on the 13th of December with the Saint Lucia ceremony which represents thanksgiving for the return of the sun. It involves the youngest daughter of the family dressing in a white robe with an evergreen crown, then all the children serve their parents coffee and lussekatter (Lucia buns). I must say it is a nice tradition to start Christmas with children doing something for their parents
  • some families give a small gift each day or December, with or without a chocolate advent calendar! This is called Adventsgave or Kalendergave
  • there is a Christmas advent calendar on TV, with a new episode shown each day of December. Called Jul I Balfjell, it has been going since 1999 and is based on a fairy tale of pixies in blue hats
  • families light a candle each day from Christmas Eve to New Years Day

Norwegian Christmas traditions

So, here are some Norwegian traditions and activities…

  • Santa is known as Julenisse and wears a red stocking cap with his long white beard – he is more gnome than person though. He knocks on the door in the evening of Christmas Eve (Juleaften) and hands out presents after asking “Are there any good children here?”
  • Nisse – a little gnome who guards farm animals. Children leave out some rice porridge (risengrynsgrot) for him or else he plays tricks on them!A Nisse toy (Scandanvian gnome associated with Christmas)
  • a goat like gnome or elf known as Julebukk delivers gifts – there are have been a few variants of this since the Vikings worshipped Thor and his goat, but the current one is fairly tame and friendly
  • the juletre (Christmas tree) is usually a spruce or pine tree and is decorated with candles, red harts, apples, straw ornaments, cornets, tinsel and glass baubles, according to individual taste
  • the same Christmas movies are played on Christmas Eve morning and evening – apparently, people got very upset a few years ago when the station suggested changing the movies that Christmas!
  • Flaklypa Grand Prix is an animated Christmas movie made in 1975 that most Norwegians love to watch each year. I will have to find it and watch it, but so far all I know is that an inventor, a penguin and a hedgehog build a race car for an oil sheikh and the soundtrack is by Bent Fabricicus-Bjerre
  • a sheaf of wheat may be left out to feed the birds – being winter and snow, this is more relevant in Norway than in Australia where food is generally available for wild life
  • skiing is a hugely popular, and skiing events are on TV throughout Christmas – their biggest finale is in Oslo on 1 January
  • they gift a huge Christmas tree to the UK every year in recognition of help provided during World War II – it stands in Trafalgar Square in London
  • often children dress up as characters of the Christmas story, usually shepherds or wise men, and go house to house singing Christmas carols
  • many people sing a traditional folk tune with the words of Musevisa (the Mouse Song)
  • O Jul Med Din Glede (Oh Christmas with your Joy) is a children’s song with actions that any adults also participate in for Christmas!
  • home made decorations are the tradition for houses – toilet roll pixies are quite common, along with star lights in windows. Keeping things home made ensures a focus on children is the belief, and it makes sense.

Norwegian Christmas food and drink

A Christmas feast, or Julebord, is held many times in Norway – it is a gathering or people with a table full of food, and can be celebrated as a work or school party through to the family and friends gathering on Christmas Eve.

  • there are specific Christmas delicacies, but these vary between towns – even the special bread called Julekake can vary in ingredients across Norway. Parties can therefore include an array of different dishes when people come together from a bigger area  Mulled wine on Christmas eve
  • Sand kager is a traditional Christmas biscuit, as is Krumkaker which are thin waffle-like biscuits curled into a cone
  • gingerbread or pepperkake, is very popular in Norway for Christmas, often shaped as people or stars and a thicker gingerbread is used to make gingerbread houses as well – pepperkakebyen is a gingerbread city in Bergen!
  • rice porridge is a common treat, eaten with butter, sugar and cinnamon for lunch on Christmas Eve or with whipped cream as a dessert. If you find the almond in your serve, you get a prize (bit like finding coins in the Christmas pudding we used to do) – the prize often being a marzipan pig
  • some rice porridge is often is left out for the birds at Christmas, too
  • Glogg is a traditional drink with red wine, almonds, raisins and spices. Many breweries also release special Christmas beers, too, known as juleol, and a soft drink called julebrus – everyone has their favourite version though!
  • the main Christmas meal is usually pork or lamb or mutton sticks (Pinnekjott), potatoes and surkal (cabbage cooked with caraway seeds and vinegar). Lye-treated codfish is also popular around Christmas time.

Have you been to Norway for Christmas, or perhaps have Norwegian family and experienced some of these traditions yourself? We’d love to hear about your Norwegian Christmas in the comments below!

* Images courtesy of Love Santa, Max PixelSmarias and Oleksandr Prokopenko

Christmas movies – angels and calendars!

Santa in Christmas movie on a TVI went away with a friend and our children over the long weekend. Once the kids were all settled in bed, we watched a Christmas movie each night which was fun.

 

Angels in the snow

A 2015 movie from George Erschbamer, Angels in the snow is classed as a children and family movie and a drama, and goes for about one and a half hours. It stars Kirsty Swanson, Chris Potter and Colin Lawrence.

The story is based on a book by Rexanne Becnal, also called Angels in the Snow, although the names are different and the book blurb doesn’t hint at the same twist as seen in the movie.

Rich businessman Charles has built a ‘cabin’ in the woods to surprise his wife and children. Their first trip to the cabin is for a Christmas holiday together, but a blizzard quickly turns things cold. A knock at the door overnight, welcomes the stranded Tucker family into the ‘cabin’ (actually a luxurious two story house) and thus the two families spend Christmas together.

Charles continues to work during their holiday – alienating his teens by insisting they go tech free when he can’t manage it himself – and his wife is obviously unhappy with the state of things. On the other hand, the Tuckers are a loving family and set a very different example for impressionable (and precocious) eight year old Emily. Slowly, the Tuckers influence the Montgomerys and both families make a tight bond – but there are some strange comments and looks from the Tuckers that hint not all is as expected.

The movie has the message of communicating and spending time with the people you love, which is a valid message, although it was perhaps a bit heavy handed in this case.

collage of children making Christmas crafts

Kids making Christmas crafts is a highlight of this movie

Some of the scenery is this movie was spectacular, and there are some nice scenes like where the kids all work together to make decorations for the Christmas tree. And there is certainly a feel good element of the Montgomery family finding their way back to each other.

But… the ending is not fun. The twist, although we saw it coming, was unbelievable and shallow, and the follow up scenes to explain it were painful to watch. I can’t say I liked most of the Montgomery family (mum was self absorbed and weepy, the son was arrogant, Emily too Pollyanna-ish to fit her family and the teen daughter was superficial) although Charles was somewhat redeemed by his connection to Bella, and the Tuckers were all lovely.

And it was a bit harsh to send the Tuckers out after the blizzard, without blankets, on a two hour walk back to their damaged car! Charles perhaps didn’t learn as much as we thought we had!

It is rated ‘family’ but kids will be bored by all the talking and may be upset or challenged by the twist at the end, so I’d leave it as an adult movie. Then again, I think I’d just leave it altogether as there are just too many weaknesses in it.

If you have seen it, what did you think? Would you recommend it to anyone?

 

The holiday calendar

Released on 2 November (the day before we watched it so this is a very new movie!), The Holiday Calendar is a Netflix movie starring Kat Graham, Ethan Peck, Quincy Brown and Ron Cephas Jones.

Abby (played by Kat Graham) lives in a small town and works for Mr Singh as a photographer rather than as the artistic photographer she wishes to be. Her best friend, Josh, is also a photographer and just returned from far places as a successful travel blogger.

Abby receives an antique advent calendar from her Gramps. The calendar is beautiful and doors only open as each new day starts, showing a little toy. Along with Abby, we learn that the calendar is magical and perhaps predicts the future with the toy produced each day.

Wooden Santa advent calendar

A simpler advent calendar than in the movie, but I like it!

The movie has Christmas, romance, magic, family and self-realisations about dreams. It has some pretty scenes and the advent calendar itself is lovely. I do like that there was a diverse range of people and that some characters were more than stereotypes (for example, Mr Singh is a bit of the grumpy old boss out for a buck but also actually cares about the kids enjoying a visit with Santa).

I would have liked to have seen more of the advent calendar items – the first few days are shown but after that we only saw a couple of them. Sure, doing a day by day recap may get a bit boring in a movie, but a few shots with all the toys in front of the calendar or something would have been a nice touch.

The outcome was somewhat predictable but what do you expect in a feel-good Christmas movie, lol! It is comfortable and cosy, with no fake threat to Christmas, the town or Abby’s family, so it adds up to a nice movie – unlikely I’d watch it again but we had fun watching it.

Christmas movies…

So there are Christmas movies for families and romantic Christmas movies.

Generally speaking, you don’t expect a Christmas movie to be up amongst the great movies – and these two are certainly not amongst the best movies I’ve ever seen.  They are not even amongst the best Christmas movies I have seen, unfortunately.

I guess I will just have to watch some other Christmas movies to find better ones I can enjoy!

Evergreen – idyllic or commercial?

Evergreen – a magical town where things are beautiful and Christmas is wonderful – sounds idyllic!

In the movie

So Evergreen is the setting for a new Christmas movie called Christmas in Evergreen: Letters to Santa, due to be released (on American TV) on 18 November.

Overall, it appears to be romance where two couples find each other and presumably kiss under the mistletoe! There is nostalgia and a concerted effort to make  Christmas wish, found in an old letter to Santa, come true.

If you like Christmas and romances, this could well be a lovely movie to watch.

Note it follows on from a 2017 movie, Christmas in Evergreen, where a small town vet wishes for her ‘most romantic Christmas ever’.

Santa in Christmas movie on a TV

Its origins

Evergreen is designed to bring to life the magic of Geoff Greenleaf’s card illustrations. Greenleaf is the master artist and illustrator at Hallmark, and Evergreen is a town based on illustrations forming the background of many of their Christmas cards.

If you have paid attention to enough cards, it may be sweet to see it come to life in a movie, and it adds an extra layer to the meaning of those card illustrations. And seeing things come to life (think books, stories, characters) can be comforting and exciting.

One review I have read goes on to list various iconic Hallmarks items that are included within the movie set of Evergreen. While this builds the authenticity of the town, it feels a bit strange to me.

For starters, I’m not sure that I would recognise things as Hallmarks property so the authenticity would be lost on me!

More than that, though, it feels very commercial and money-grabbing to have such icons in a movie – I want to relax and feel the Christmas spirit, not thinking about a big corporate and their profits!

However, this is perhaps expected on the channel showing this movie as part of their Count Down to Christmas – it is actually called the Hallmark Channel! Again, an entire channel owned and managed by a retail-based company feels strange to me, but I gather it has been in place for many years in the USA. I am curious to watch that channel and see how commercial it is – maybe the advertising is more subtle like including their icons and settings in programs.

What do you think – does this movie and channel feel too much of an ad for Hallmark, or is it just good that this company is putting money into making Christmas movies to watch?

 

* Image courtesy of Belchonock at 123rf

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